5G Standards

5G Standards

5G Standards

5G Standards for the newest cellular network setup. It is coming sooner than you may think with earliest guesses by the end of 2018.

Leading firms such as Korea Telecom, Verizon and EE have announced plans to offer 5G standards and services to consumers in the future, but there’s a clear difference between rhetoric and action. Dr William Webb, a fellow at the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineering and CEO of the Weightless SIG, says common standards are needed if 5G is to evolve.

“Because the definition of 5G is so vague, it’s hard to say far we are from rollout. If 5G is just whatever we rollout in say 2020, then by definition we’re three years from rollout – but what that will be and how different it will be from what we have today? Korea Telecom claims it will deploy 5G this year, ready for the Winter Olympics, and Verizon also aims to start fibre-replacement deployment this year or next,” he says.

“However, without any standards, whatever they deploy is not a globally agreed solution. Some suggest that a ‘real’ 5G – with a carefully developed and worthwhile new technology – might not occur until 2025. It’s all a bit of a mess. Many expect that the standardisation process will act as a filter, delivering what collectively is determined to be important and viable, and then we will label whatever arrives as 5G, perhaps around 2018-2020.”

The International Telecommunication Union – a wing of the UN dedicated to the oversight of telecommunications technology across the world – answered one of the crucial questions around 5G: what it actually is. In a draft document, the organisation stated that in order to qualify as 5G, a network cell must deliver a minimum peak data rate for downloads of 21GB/sec and an uplink peak data rate of 10GB/sec. Maximum latency is also set at 4ms.

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