5 Tips to Protect your Sensitive Information on your Smartphone or Tablet

Protect Your Sensitive Information

Protect Your Sensitive Information

1. Protect your Device

There isn’t anything much worse than losing your phone. 200,000 phones, tablets and iPads are lost or stolen each day and the cost of replacing those devices is not cheap if you want the same make/model. The best way to prevent an unexpected high replacement cost is to insure your phone. You’ll typically spend around $12/month and have some sort of deductible, but that cost is much cheaper than paying the full retail price of your phone; which in some cases is upwards of $800 or $900 if you have a flagship phone.

Protect Your Sensitive Information2. Password Protect your Device

Like most of us, you probably have some pretty sensitive information stored on your phone or tablet. Putting a password on it is easy and highly recommended. Android devices have these security features under the Settings option, under Security. Apple users have this feature in their iOS operating system in the Settings option under General Options. Pick the lock method that best suits you.

3. Keep your Apps and Operating System Updated

Selecting the option for ‘Auto Update’ is the best way to keep your Apps current. Periodically, check your system updates in your iPhone, iPad or Android devices for the latest over-the-air operating system updates. By doing this, you’ll be certain to have the latest security features installed on your device.

4. Online Payment Logout

When you shop online from your smartphone or tablet, make sure you log out of those sites after your transaction is complete. Always avoid public Wi-Fi spots when making those transactions as many people are often connected to them and they are usually far less secure.

5. Never Give Out Personal Information

Protect Your Sensitive InformationI know this sounds simple, but there are clever scammers out there who may try to lure you into doing this with some deception. If you get a text message or email request from what you think is your bank or some business, you may want to contact that business to confirm the request before sending any information. Most businesses will not request this information in an email or text message. You should also avoid clicking any links within unsolicited emails and texts as they can sometimes be ‘phishing’ attempts.